Thank to living in Copenhagen, I had the chance to get to know Malmö a little bit better. The two cities are separated by a strait, called Øresund (Swedish: Öresund), but since 2000, an 8 km long (the whole link is 16 km) bridge with the same name, connects them. The view of the bridge is fascinating, and I'm lucky enough to live as close to it, that I can see every day, even from the windows of the nearby gym, when I'm sweating on the treadmill.

I guess, this is the point when I have to stop to show off. I know that many people not just see the bridge, but cross it day by day, as in Denmark the wages are a little bit higher, whereas in Sweden the living expenses are lower, so many people on both sides chose the commuter lifestyle. All in all, YES, this is an important bridge, because, in a more romantic view, it connects Scandinavia with Central and Western Europe. Those who are familiar with the Nordic noir, might also get an idea about Malmö and the bridge from the TV series, Bron/Broen, which was made in Danish and Swedish co-production.

Photo by Kieran Lynam
Photo by Kieran Lynam

Malmö is the perfect stop if you are bored with Copenhagen, or want to breathe some Swedish air, or just do some shopping (who doesn't want to do some shopping??). So let's see how you can travel to this cute little town. You can go by car of course, but be aware that you need to pay a fee to pass the bridge, which is €54 per single trip (yes, this is the most expensive way). The train ticket is much cheaper €15 per single trip on the 2nd class. My personal recommendation would be to go by bus, there are several companies who offer cheap trips to Malmö. The prices are usually from €7 to €10 per single trip. The travel time varies between 30-45 minutes.

Photo by Ben Cremin
Photo by Ben Cremin

So once you arrive at the center, you have several options where to start the sightseeing. I visited the city in November, though this is not the best time of the year for huge walks, because of the chilly wind, almost constantly blowing during winter time and make you feel the cold even colder. I would suggest late spring or early autumn for the exploration of the city.

Photo by Bri Weldon
Photo by Bri Weldon

First, you should head to the Western Harbour. This fast developing district was once the city's port, now a splendid example of the Scandinavian Architecture, with the fascinating Turning Torso in the middle. The new landmark of the city is Scandinavia's highest building (190 m) and a breathtaking attraction in itself, though the other buildings, the beach, and the Øresund bridge (again haha) make the experience complete. This place symbolizes the modern urban area which raises the quality of life of its citizens. While walking around this district, I was wondering how great can be to call this place your home. These Scandinavians really have the idea how to develop their environment to be liveable.

The shopping street is another unavoidable stop during your visit. Which made this street very inviting for me, were not only the shops, but the cafés along the way, you can find some very cosy among them, unfortunately they were all crowded, so we ended up in an Espresso House (don't take me wrong, I love it, but this time I wanted to visit a local café). I would reccommend you to check out two places better once you're there: the Gustav Adolfs Torg and the Lilla Torg. The first one nowaday is an important meeting point, which hosts various events such as festivals, fairs and flower exhibitions. The second has always been a marketplace, surrounded by charming old houses which now function as cafés giving a vibrating atmosphere for this exciting place.

Malmö is full of with nice parks and before you leave, you should check one of them. For the last stop I would reccommend Kungsparken (The King's Park) which is located in the center of the city, built by the spirit of the famous English parks. Fountains and gardens play the main role here, which make the park even more picturesque.

Photo by L.E Daniel Larsson
Photo by L.E Daniel Larsson

Top tips:

The prices are a bit lower than in CPH, not so significantly, yet you might catch some good deals, so keep your eyes open every time.